The Naked Lady Who Stood on Her Head: A Psychiatrists Stories of His Most Bizarre Cases

The Naked Lady Who Stood on Her Head: A Psychiatrist's Stories of His Most Bizarre Cases
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He doesn't start with 'I had this patient this one time who had this thing. As my daughter was attempting to insert whatever suits your fancy here , I received a call from my publisher. He and I had been friends for years. He told me that one of the girls reviewing my book had a problem and thought she might be benefited by talking to me.

Naked Lady Who Stood on Her Head/Man with Shrinking Penis

Then you get hit with the patient. Right away you don't know exactly what's wrong with them, only part of their symptoms. As each story progresses, you learn more about the patient as well as more about the way that Dr. Small dealt with them. Once the story wraps up and you find the issue, it doesn't stop there. I'm definitely a 'But what happened next!

I wasn't disappointed! At the end of each story Dr. Small gives a small update on each person. Honestly, I just loved this book. I couldn't put it down. The stories were intriguing.

Being an amateur sleuth, I always tried to figure out what was wrong with the person before I was told and I failed with every single person! Best of all for me was Dr. Small's writing style. It has just the perfect amount of flow to keep you intrigued. It really is like sitting down and listening to stories from a trusted friend. This is great if you're a psychiatry student and want to read about a few cases.

Personally, I think it's even better if you aren't. Just sit back and enjoy the ride!

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If you'd like to check out a preview of the book, go here and they'll email you one! View 2 comments. At the mental health clinic where I work, the psychiatrists spend 15 minutes with each client managing their medications 30 minutes to interview a new patient and start them on meds. Most of this work has been outsourced to psychologists and counselors so that the doctors can focus on medication management.

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This book gave me lots to think about as a counselor-in-training, especially with regard to psychodynamic theory, which the author seems to practice. I recommend it for anyone interested in therapy. Quotes: It has always amazed me that people feel such a stigma about their psychiatric conditions. Despite the remarkable advances in psychiatric diagnosis and treatment, many still believe that mental illness is a sign of personal weakness and something to be embarrassed about.

View 1 comment. Sep 10, Peter Mcloughlin rated it really liked it Shelves: both , biography , complexity , to , american-history , to , psychology , medicine , general-history , nonfiction. Some very odd tales from the world of psychiatry. Each case which starts out as a puzzle in the form an individuals suffering. The tales may be colorful to a spectator but involve the pain of some disorder or life problem. A doctor has to combine sleuthing abilities with a form of empathy help the people he or she cares for.

It is interesting to see the world through their eyes. Doctors don't share their perspective enough. Medicine is a profession to learn from.

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The title and the subject matter made me think this could be the most interesting book ever written. Maybe I've read too much about psychology or seen too many episodes of Grey's Anatomy, but none of the stories Small recounts were new to me. Small also makes the mistake of thinking the reader cares that he ate sushi after a strange appointment or that he had a date with his wife on a certain date in I really wanted to like this book, but I was extremely disappointed. The Naked Lady Who Stood on Her Head is a collection of short essays by psychiatrist Gary Small describing the "most bizarre cases" he dealt with over decades of practice.

The first essays are from encounters at Massachusetts General during Small's days as a resident. From there, we follow Small back to his native California where he continues to treat patients, conducts research, and settles in as a geriatric specialist. If judged by its subtitle alone "a psychiatrist's stories of his most biz The Naked Lady Who Stood on Her Head is a collection of short essays by psychiatrist Gary Small describing the "most bizarre cases" he dealt with over decades of practice.

If judged by its subtitle alone "a psychiatrist's stories of his most bizarre cases" , readers may be disappointed. Any casual student of psychology will not be impressed by stories about shopping addicts, psychopathic husbands with second families, and stress-induced sudden blindness. The subtitle draws in the reader by promising shock value it happened to me! The value of his book is beyond Small's "craziest" patients.

I think this book would have been better if it was framed as a personal memoir, or of a physician's reflections as he looks back on his career. The patient stories are framed by conversations with Small's colleagues, friends, and family, where he gives us context of where he was in his career at the time and how he has grown as a physician since then. He recognizes several times that his response as a young psychiatrist would be vastly different from his response today, as a professional with years of experience. It was fascinating to read about how how Small worked through challenging diagnoses, and how his professional interactions with his patients shaped his personal interactions with friends and family, and vice versa: how his personal life affected the way he treated his patients.

Those passages were what I liked best about this book - self-reflection.

Naked Lady Who Stood On Her Head

Small is a brilliant physician, and I would have liked to read more about his method as a psychiatrist and less about his house calls to wealthy patients. Hopefully in the future he will give us that book! That said, Gary Small's nonfict book on 30 years of bizarre psychiatric cases almost lost me on the first chapter, which deals with a neurotic "housewife"--and Small doesn't use this word with any irony. Since I have a peculiar brain lesion that forces me to finish reading everything I pick up, I soldiered on and found the rest of the book fascinating: people who want limbs cut off; freaky parents and traumatized children; betrayals, Cinderella freaks, and liars--good stuff.

Sandy Dykstra's peeps could have done a better job editing: "her face reddened [in rage]" or "she stomped off [in a huff]"--but we have a physician here who's first love isn't the craft of writing, so I allowed for him not being an Oliver Sacks and honored his mission showing readers that psychiatry is not such a bad thing. He accomplished that, and showed much humility despite his fancy-schmancy LA milieu.

Lots of nice nuggets in his recaptured dialog, as in a heart-breaking segment on his diagnosing his esteemed colleague with early Alzheimer's, after the colleague feels he's been a fraud and denies his particular genius. Small says to him, "Anything that's new and makes the world a better place is at the core of creativity. That's just Met them both at Book-Works for its mind-brain book series last night--they're good characters on their page and pretty nifty in person, too.

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This book reads like an episode of house and is likely as fictional. One chapter pits neurologists against psychiatrists. I can guarantee you that many neurologists respect psychiatrists. However, this author is exactly the kind of psychiatrist that always drove my neuro professors crazy. After having read this book I am not at all surprised that he has an issue with neurologists and that they have an issue with him.

Prior to reading this, I did see he wrote a "train your brain" book that every This book reads like an episode of house and is likely as fictional.

Bizarre Cases That Made Even A Shrink Go ‘Huh’? – CBS Los Angeles

Prior to reading this, I did see he wrote a "train your brain" book that every professor I have ever had warned me against, but I thought maybe he had some good things to say. He went to Harvard; so I assumed he was titling his book to appeal to the masses but actually planned to include solid, replicated, and reasonable neuroscience. If this book is any indication of what his train your brain book will be like, I will pass. That said, I did find the book entertaining enough to finish it.

So, I guess there is that. Much more enjoyable than I expected. The author s seems well balanced - not pretentious, not facetiously modest. The stories are told with enough empathy that it doesn't feel like the patients are exploited for the sake of story I enjoyed it - interesting insight, enjoyable narration.

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It isn't quite a "surreal and bizarre" novel, and certainly not a "circus sideshow" - though there's a bit of the bizarre and surreal Much more enjoyable than I expected. It isn't quite a "surreal and bizarre" novel, and certainly not a "circus sideshow" - though there's a bit of the bizarre and surreal included. There's a good mix of fairly common psychological issues.

Actually, you might read the "afterword" first, if you want insight into why he's written about those particular cases. I enjoyed the interactions between Gary and his peers and wife, and the humor. Especially his wife, but some of the comments between colleagues were entertaining. It feels a bit polished in a way that keeps you from really emotionally connecting with the writing, but I suspect it has to be that way to relate those stories.

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You strangely seemed a worse faculty than this. Rockwell Jr. I think younger people are better at it. So don't worry, don, there's good memory out there. Vorgan's lively and revealing storytelling, which will be almost as good as seeing the good doctor himself.

It is not a book to "escape" with, but rather more like "story hour" where you're learning something in an enjoyable or interesting, depending on your perspective way. I don't see myself needing to reread it, so it is definitely a library loaner for me, but I will probably check in to a couple of his other books, as it turns out a primary focus in his research is Alzheimers and similar, but I think Alzheimers is the focal point. I expected much much more from someone so experienced.. This book falls flat. The author warns you in the beginning that the book is written in chronological order as his career matured yet almost half of the book leaves you cringing for more thought, humility and insights.

I also felt the book lacked e Disappointing. I also felt the book lacked empathy.. Yes the author has to be detached as a requirement of his profession but in this case, he just sounds judgmental and overbearing. What's with the title calling these cases "bizarre"! Lastly, there are undercurrents of insecurity as the author tries hard to convince why psychiatry is also a "real" science but looks like he had to convince himself the most.. This was fascinating! Psychology, especially the abnormal kind, has always amazed me. The stories in this book were unique, eye-opening, and have made for a well-rounded and exciting career for Dr.